Virginia Just Became the 38th State to Pass the Equal Rights Amendment. Here's What to Know About the History of the ERA (2022)

On Wednesday, Virginia became the 38th state to vote to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment — thus fulfilling the requirement that three-quarters of the states must approve an Amendment in order to add it to the U.S. Constitution. Since the Amendment was proposed a century ago, the U.S. has never been so close to enshrining the equality of all people, regardless of sex, in its bedrock legal document.

But that doesn’t mean the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) will be added to the Constitution any time soon. There will likely be a long fight in the courts or in the U.S. legislature before that happens, as the legislators who originally passed the Amendment in 1972 set, and then extended, a time limit for ratification by the states. That deadline passed more than three decades ago.

ERA advocates note that this limit is not declared in the text of the Amendment itself — and regardless, Virginia’s decision is a historic moment for the rights of American women.

Here’s what to know about Equal Rights Amendment history and what could happen to it next.

What is the Equal Rights Amendment?

For a document that carries so much political weight and history, the Equal Rights Amendment is surprisingly short. As passed by Congress in 1972, the amendment said:

SECTION 1. Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.

SECTION 2. The Congress shall have the power to enforce, by appropriate legislation, the provisions of this article.

SECTION 3. This amendment shall take effect two years after the date of ratification.

The original amendment was written in 1923 by members of the National Woman’s Party, which itself was formed in June 1916 to push for women’s right to vote. After the 19th Amendment was ratified by on Aug. 18, 1920, the party turned its attention to the broader issue of women’s equality. The result: the ERA.

But the amendment failed to gain much widespread support in the 1920s partly because it divided members of the women’s movement along class lines. Working women at the time were focused on gaining workplace protections for women and children, and some were concerned that an Equal Rights Amendment would endanger laws that made factories safer and limited the number of hours women could work.

Decades would pass before the Equal Rights Amendment would gain real momentum. By that point, both men and women had won protections in the workplace, and the women of the second-wave feminist movement — including some who had participated in the fight for civil rights in the 1960s — were pushing for equality in their jobs, universities and homes.

(Video) With Virginia ratification, where does the Equal Rights Amendment go from here?

Virginia Just Became the 38th State to Pass the Equal Rights Amendment. Here's What to Know About the History of the ERA (2)

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Who first proposed the Equal Rights Amendment?

Virginia Just Became the 38th State to Pass the Equal Rights Amendment. Here's What to Know About the History of the ERA (3)

Six National Woman's Party members gathered around a desk at National Woman's Party headquarters. Left to right: Mabel Vernon, Dora Lewis, Alice Paul (seated), Florence Brewer Boeckel, Abby Scott Baker, and Anita Pollitzer. Feb. 1921.

(Video) The History of the Equal Rights Amendment: 3 Things You Should Know

Photo 12—Universal Images Group via Getty

The Equal Rights Amendment was written by Alice Paul (1885-1977), the founder of the National Woman’s Party.

Born to a New Jersey family of Quakers who highly valued education, Paul studied at colleges and universities in the U.S. and the United Kingdom and earned an impressive number of degrees, including a Master’s and doctorate in sociology from the University of Pennsylvania, a law degree from Washington College of Law, and law Master’s and doctoral degrees from American University. But her life’s work really came into focus after she joined demonstrations for the British suffragist movement in the early 1900s. When she returned to the U.S. in 1910, she pushed American suffragists to try the confrontational techniques she’d seen applied in Britain, including civil disobedience.

Concerned that the National American Woman Suffrage Association was too moderate, in 1913 Paul and Lucy Burns formed the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage, which was later reconstituted as the National Woman’s Party, and employed more aggressive tactics. The group used parades, petitions, protests and pickets to push for the right to vote. In 1917, Paul was sentenced to seven months in prison for picketing the White House, and was force-fed after going on a prison hunger strike.

After women successfully won the right to vote in 1920, the National Woman’s Party turned its attention to the next steps. Jessica Neuwirth, a women’s rights lawyer and a founder of the ERA Coalition, a current-day campaign to pass the amendment, tells TIME that suffrage advocates saw their work as remedying the intentional omission of women from the U.S. Constitution.

“It was an intentional exclusion of women from the constitution, because they were basically not considered full citizens who should have the right to vote,” Neuwirth says. “Once they got the vote, they wanted to get all the other rights that they should have.“

Paul’s crusade in the 1920s was unsuccessful, but in the 1950s, Michigan Congresswoman Martha Griffiths took up the torch. A former judge elected to the House in 1954, Griffiths worked to have sex discrimination added to Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and pushed the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to double down on its enforcement of the Act. She also introduced the amendment on the House floor every year, but was unsuccessful until 1970, when Griffiths filed a discharge position that forced the legislation out of committee and led to the amendment being passed by the House. Although the Senate failed to pass it that legislative session, Griffiths reintroduced it the following year. It passed the House on Oct. 12, 1971 and the Senate on March 22, 1972.

Why did the Equal Rights Amendment of 1972 fail?

Virginia Just Became the 38th State to Pass the Equal Rights Amendment. Here's What to Know About the History of the ERA (4)

Stop ERA national Chairman Phyllis Schafly leads members opposed to the equal rights amendment in a song about the pro ERA forces plan for a national demonstration in the capital city.

Bettmann—Bettmann Archive

In passing the Equal Rights Amendment, Congress had set a seven-year deadline for ratification. At first, ratification seemed to be a given, with states quickly approving the amendment, but those ratifications slowed to a trickle. Crucially, the amendment’s passage had had a major consequence: mobilizing anti-feminists, including its arch-opponent Phyllis Schlafly, to defeat it.

In many ways, Schlafly was deeply contradictory. Although she praised stay-at-home mothers, Schlafly — a mother of six — dedicated much of her life to political organizing and traveled the country giving lectures. She believed that the ERA would do away with much of the special status granted to women, including the right to be supported by their husbands, and would damage the traditional American family. Schlafly founded the organization “STOP ERA” (an acronym for “stop taking away our privileges”) to oppose the Equal Rights Amendment.

(Video) A New Era for the ERA - Briefing on the Equal Rights Amendment Time Limit Removal

“What I am defending is the real rights of women,” Schlafly once said. “A woman should have the right to be in the home as a wife and mother.”

Telling her audiences that the ERA would eventually lead to a future of gender-neutral bathrooms and women being drafted into the military, she successfully made many people think twice about what Constitutionally mandated equality of the sexes would mean. Deirdre Condit, an associate professor of political science at Virginia Commonwealth University, notes that in fact Schlafly was right that the future would include such things — but they came to pass even without the amendment.

“Well, if you fast forward to 2019, without the Equal Rights Amendment having passed, we’re trying to figure out how to deal with bathrooms in a multi-gendered universe. And we’re trying to figure out, should in fact women be drafted if men are drafted?” says Condit. ”And while we were are unsettled as a culture about these new questions, they did not fail to emerge because we didn’t have an Equal Rights Amendment.”

The deadline for ratification was extended by three years from 1979 to 1982. Still, when that deadline arrived, only 35 states had passed the amendment — three states short of the three-quarters majority required by the Constitution.

Condit notes that many of the states that failed to pass the Equal Rights Amendment had few women in their state legislatures, and historically had poor records of protecting the rights of both women and people of color.

Could the Equal Rights Amendment still be ratified today?

Virginia Just Became the 38th State to Pass the Equal Rights Amendment. Here's What to Know About the History of the ERA (5)

Demonstrators picketed outside the Federal Building in Minneapolis, June 9, 1982, in support of the Equal Rights Amendment and in silent vigil in support of seven fasting ERA supporters in Illinois.

Star Tribune via Getty Images—Star Tribune via Getty Images

Virginia legislators’ decision to approve the Equal Rights Amendment means that the Amendment has fulfilled the requirement for three-fourths of the states to ratify a Constitutional Amendment. However, the ERA still faces another major obstacle: a past Congress had set a deadline for the Amendment’s ratification.

When that deadline passed in 1982, TIME reported that the Equal Rights Amendment had been “killed.”

Over the last five years or so, however, advocacy groups such as the ERA Coalition have help to renew the public’s interest in the amendment — and the possibility that it could still be ratified. Through their efforts, three more states ratified the amendment: Nevada on March 21, 2017, Illinois on May 30, 2018, and now, Virginia. In April of 2019, Congress held its first hearing on ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment in 36 years.

But what about that 1982 deadline?

(Video) The Equal Rights Amendment, Past Present and Future

Linda Coberly, a lawyer and the chair of the ERA Coalition’s Legal Task Force, tells TIME that she believes it’s possible to get around the deadline because that’s not part of the amendment itself, and the Constitution does not set deadlines for amendment ratification. In fact, the Constitution sets a requirement that one Congress can’t bind a future Congress, so modern legislators could alter the time frame.

“It would be unprecedented in our history for Congress to allow a joint resolution deadline to stand in the way of the effectiveness of an amendment that has been ratified by three-fourths of the states,” Coberly says.

Going forward, that means that Congress could potentially vote to eliminate the deadline, or it could be challenged in court.

How would an Equal Rights Amendment affect women’s rights?

Although American women have made significant gains in equality since the 1970s — and certainly since the 1920s — advocates say that an Equal Rights Amendment could still have a profound effect on the law and on American society.

Advocates say that the amendment is help back by the sense among some people that it’s not necessary, but proponents argue that it could strengthen the legal basis for combating violence against women, pay inequality and maternity leave.

Meanwhile, some contemporary opponents argue the amendment could have more of an impact than they’d want, for example leading to the striking down of laws that restrict access to abortion. Louisiana Rep. Mike Johnson raised these concerns during Congress’s hearing on the Amendment this spring. However, Coberly calls this line of thinking “fear-mongering” and points out that the Supreme Court has already upheld women’s right to seek an abortion, even without the ERA.

“Passing a constitutional amendment does not automatically invalidate anything,” Coberly says. “It would provide a basis, potentially, for a lawsuit, and courts will need to decide whether any particular law — whether it’s on abortion or something else — constitutes discrimination on the basis of sex and is invalid under any equal rights amendment.”

Professor Tracy Thomas of The University of Akron School of Law tells TIME that the law would prevent women’s rights from sliding back, and eliminate some “wiggle room” that leaves space in the law for stereotypes to affect civil rights. She also argues that protecting women’s rights in the Constitution would have a major cultural impact.

There’s this overriding structure of the highest law in the land that has this absolute command, and so that has to trickle down,” says Thomas. She says that recent events such as the rise of the #MeToo movement reveal how quickly society can change. “Once you start changing the culture and the dialogue, things that were acceptable become unacceptable really quickly.”

Coberly notes that many people don’t even know that the U.S. hasn’t ratified the amendment yet. However, she feels that in the last few years, a growing number of people have come to believe that such a protection is important.

“I think there’s been a more widespread understanding among both women and men that we have not truly established equality in our culture,” she says, “and the laws that we have enacted are not sufficient to protect against sex discrimination in all avenues.”

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Contact us at letters@time.com.

(Video) Why hasn't the Equal Rights Amendment been ratified?

FAQs

Did Virginia pass the Equal Rights Amendment? ›

“Congress must act now to remove the arbitrary time limit standing in the way of the ERA. We must live up to our nation's promise of equality.” In January 2020, Virginia became the 38th state to ratify the ERA, which was first proposed in 1972.

Did the 38 states ratify the Equal Rights Amendment? ›

Yet the ERA was never added to the Constitution - because Congress also set a deadline. It said 38, or 3/4 of the states, had to ratify the proposed amendment by 1979. It later extended the deadline to 1982. So when in 2020 Virginia became the final state needed to ratify the ERA, it was almost 40 years too late.

What became the 38th state to ratify Twenty Fourth amendment? ›

Ratification was completed on January 23, 1964. The Georgia legislature did make a last-second attempt to be the 38th state to ratify. This was a surprise as "no Southern help could be expected" for the amendment.

What did the Equal Rights Amendment do? ›

The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) is a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution designed to guarantee equal legal rights for all American citizens regardless of sex.

Why did the Equal Rights Amendment fail to pass quizlet? ›

Terms in this set (173) Why did the Equal Rights Amendment fail to pass? a. It was not ratified by the necessary 38 states.

What was the primary goal of the failed Equal Rights Amendment quizlet? ›

This amendment proposed to eliminate all legal distinctions "on account of sex." After winning the right to vote, women needed equal access to employment, education, and all other opportunities or citizens.

Why did the Equal Rights Amendment fail? ›

However, during the mid-1970s, a conservative backlash against feminism eroded support for the Equal Rights Amendment, which ultimately failed to achieve ratification by the a requisite 38, or three-fourths, of the states, by the deadline set by Congress.

How many states ratified the Equal Rights Amendment quizlet? ›

How many states approved the ERA? It was approved by 35 state legislatures with only 3 more state ratifications needed to put it into the Constitution.

Why was the Equal Rights Amendment Defeated? ›

Phyllis Schlafly was perhaps the most visible opponent of the Equal Rights Amendment. Her "Stop ERA" campaign hinged on the belief that the ERA would eliminate laws designed to protect women and led to the eventual defeat of the amendment.

What is the status of the Equal Rights Amendment? ›

Res. 638 passed the House and Senate in 1978, but no additional states ratified the ERA before the June 30, 1982, deadline. Nevada ratified the ERA in 2017, and Illinois ratified the amendment in 2018. Virginia became the 38th state to ratify the ERA in 2020.

What states have not ratified the Equal Rights Amendment? ›

The 15 states that did not ratify the Equal Rights Amendment before the 1982 deadline were Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Utah, and Virginia.

How would the Equal Rights Amendment become part of the Constitution? ›

The resolution states that the ERA has satisfied all Article V requirements to amend the Constitution: a two-thirds vote in the House and the Senate, achieved in 1971 and 1972, and ratification by three-fourths of the states.

What was the goal of the Equal Rights Amendment Brainly? ›

Equal Rights Amendment (ERA), a proposed amendment to the U.S. Constitution that would invalidate many state and federal laws that discriminate against women; its central underlying principle is that sex should not determine the legal rights of men or women.

How has the Equal Rights Amendment affected women's civil rights quizlet? ›

How has the Equal Rights Amendment affected women's civil rights? It has had little effect because it was not formally adopted. In the first major civil rights case addressed by the U.S. Supreme Court, Dred Scott v. Sandford, which of the following best describes the issues at stake?

What happened to the Equal Rights Amendment ERA quizlet? ›

In 1978, a joint resolution of Congress extended the ratification deadline to June 30, 1982, but no further states ratified the amendment and it died.

What was one effect of the women's movement on society quizlet? ›

Which was one effect of the women movement on society? Gays and lesbians, American Indians and Hispanics all organized to advocate for their civil rights during the 1960s.

What was the result of the Equal Rights Amendment of 1972? ›

In 1972, the Equal Rights Amendment, designed to guarantee protection against sexual discrimination for women under the law, passed both houses of Congress and was sent to the individual states for ratification.

What happened to the Equal Rights Amendment proposed in 1972? ›

While the text of the amendment has changed over the years, the gist of it has remained the same. The version approved by Congress in 1972 and sent to the states reads: “Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex.

Why was the ERA a failure? ›

The equality rhetoric of the ERA and its proponents could not overcome the fears engendered by the campaign against its ratification. The sight of traditional women vocalizing their opposition to the amendment altered the political dynamic in enough states to cause the ERA's failure.

Which goal of the women's movement sparked a debate that continues to this day? ›

Which goal of the women's movement sparked a debate that continues to this day? Securing abortion rights.

In what year was the Equal Rights Amendment added to the Constitution quizlet? ›

Equal Rights Amendment, 1972.

What was the Equal Rights Amendment quizlet? ›

The proposed Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) states that the rights guaranteed by the Constitution apply equally to all persons regardless of their sex.

How has the women's movement changed society? ›

The feminist movement has effected change in Western society, including women's suffrage; greater access to education; more equitable pay with men; the right to initiate divorce proceedings; the right of women to make individual decisions regarding pregnancy (including access to contraceptives and abortion); and the ...

What was one of the successes of the women's movement? ›

Divorce laws were liberalized; employers were barred from firing pregnant women; and women's studies programs were created in colleges and universities. Record numbers of women ran for—and started winning—political office.

What was the Equal Rights Amendment why did it not get ratified by enough states quizlet? ›

Passed by Congress, the amendment specified "Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex." It did not become part of the Constitution because in order to become an amendment, three quarters (75%) of the states must ratify the amendment.

Which of these three states did not ratify the ERA? ›

The states that did not ratify the ERA included Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Utah, and Virginia.

What was the ERA how many states eventually ratified it quizlet? ›

The proposed Equal Rights Amendment (ERA), passed by congress in 1972 and eventually ratified by 35 states, stated the following: "Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the US or any state on the basis of sex."

What would happen if the ERA was passed? ›

Passing an ERA will put the full weight of the U.S. Constitution behind employment laws relating to the prevention of sex discrimination in hiring, firing, promotions, and benefits – especially in the public sector.

Which statement best describes the main idea of for the Equal Rights Amendment? ›

Which statement best describes the main idea of "For the Equal Rights Amendment" by Representative Shirley Chisholm.. C-The country's legal system should protect the rights of women.

Who supported the Equal Rights Amendment and why? ›

In the early 1940s, both the Republican and Democratic parties added support of the Equal Rights Amendment to their political platforms. Twenty years after she first introduced it, Alice Paul rewrote the ERA in 1943.

How many amendments are there? ›

The US Constitution has 27 amendments that protect the rights of Americans.

Who wrote the Constitution? ›

James Madison is known as the Father of the Constitution because of his pivotal role in the document's drafting as well as its ratification.

What does the Constitution say about women's rights? ›

Passed by Congress June 4, 1919, and ratified on August 18, 1920, the 19th amendment granted women the right to vote. The 19th amendment legally guarantees American women the right to vote. Achieving this milestone required a lengthy and difficult struggle—victory took decades of agitation and protest.

Which states did not ratify the Constitution? ›

Rhode Island's role in the drafting and ratification of the US Constitution was unlike other states. Rhode Island was the only state not to send delegates to the Constitutional Convention in 1787.

Who wrote the Equal Rights Amendment? ›

The Equal Rights Amendment was written in 1923 by Alice Paul, a leader of the woman suffrage movement and a women's rights activist with three law degrees. It was introduced in Congress in the same year and subsequently reintroduced in every Congressional session for half a century.

What rights are protected by the Constitution? ›

It protects freedom of speech, the press, assembly, and the right to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. The Second Amendment gives citizens the right to bear arms. The Third Amendment prohibits the government from quartering troops in private homes, a major grievance during the American Revolution.

What kind of difference if any would passage of the Equal Rights Amendment make in the governance of gender in the United States? ›

What kind of difference, if any, would passage of the Equal Rights Amendment make in the governance of gender in the United States? It would constitutionally guarantee gender equality and feminists would no longer have to fight for rights individually.

What did the Equal Rights Amendment do? ›

The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) is a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution designed to guarantee equal legal rights for all American citizens regardless of sex.

What do you think was the most positive impact of NOW and other women's organizations? ›

The most important impact of the NOW and other women organizations would be the bill of rights that they established for women. This made society treat everyone equal no matter what gender. This made and set a path for equal wages, equal positions, and most important, equal morals and respect.

When was the Equal Rights Amendment passed? ›

50 years ago the Equal Rights Amendment was approved by the Senate. The U.S. Senate overwhelmingly voted to approve the Equal Rights Amendment in 1972, paving the way for it to become the 28th amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

Why did the Equal Rights Amendment fail to pass? ›

However, during the mid-1970s, a conservative backlash against feminism eroded support for the Equal Rights Amendment, which ultimately failed to achieve ratification by the a requisite 38, or three-fourths, of the states, by the deadline set by Congress.

What was the objective of the women's suffrage movement quizlet? ›

Terms in this set (8)

Women's suffrage? Political Reform Movement whose main goal was to achieve the right to vote for women.

Where in the Constitution is the equal protection clause? ›

U.S. Constitution

The Fourteenth Amendment's Equal Protection Clause requires states to practice equal protection. Equal protection forces a state to govern impartially—not draw distinctions between individuals solely on differences that are irrelevant to a legitimate governmental objective.

What was the main goal of the Equal Rights Amendment quizlet? ›

Terms in this set (6)

This amendment proposed to eliminate all legal distinctions "on account of sex." After winning the right to vote, women needed equal access to employment, education, and all other opportunities or citizens.

What was the goal of the Equal Rights Amendment Brainly? ›

Equal Rights Amendment (ERA), a proposed amendment to the U.S. Constitution that would invalidate many state and federal laws that discriminate against women; its central underlying principle is that sex should not determine the legal rights of men or women.

What was one reason why the Equal Rights Amendment failed quizlet? ›

What was one reason why the equal rights amendment failed? Many people feared potential unintended effects of the amendment because it was vaguely worded.

Is Virginia a woman's state? ›

Virginia passes ERA, becomes 38th state approving amendment for women.

How many states are needed to ratified the Equal Rights Amendment? ›

Article 5 of the U.S. Constitution sets out two requirements for amendments: approval by two-thirds of both chambers of Congress and ratification by three-fourths (38) of the states.

How many states ratified the 27th amendment? ›

Congress on May 20, 1992 voted by a unanimous vote of the Senate and by a vote of 414 to 3 in favor of “accepting” the Twenty-Seventh Amendment as having been validly approved. Forty-six out of fifty states ratified the Amendment, and no state that had once ratified the Amendment tried to “unratify” it.

When did Virginia ratify the Constitution? ›

Virginia: June 25, 1788. New York: July 26, 1788. North Carolina: November 21, 1789.

How can I get a divorce fast? ›

By filing a no-fault, uncontested divorce with an agreement an attorney has reviewed—especially in a state with a short residency period—you can get a quick divorce. The benefits of a quick divorce are that it saves money on legal fees and it saves a lot of stress.

Is Virginia a no-fault divorce state? ›

No-Fault Divorce in Virginia

Virginia has only one no-fault ground for divorce: separation. Couples who wish to qualify for a no-fault divorce must prove that they've lived separate and apart without cohabitation (sexual relations) for a continuous period of at least one year. (Va. Code § 20-91(A)(9) (2022).)

How long after divorce can you remarry in Virginia? ›

After your Final Decree of Divorce is signed by a judge, your divorce is final. However, you must wait at least 30 days before getting remarried so that the deadline to appeal has lapsed. Bigamy is a criminal offense and can be a felony or misdemeanor in Virginia.

Why did the Equal Rights Amendment fail? ›

However, during the mid-1970s, a conservative backlash against feminism eroded support for the Equal Rights Amendment, which ultimately failed to achieve ratification by the a requisite 38, or three-fourths, of the states, by the deadline set by Congress.

What would happen if the ERA was passed? ›

Passing an ERA will put the full weight of the U.S. Constitution behind employment laws relating to the prevention of sex discrimination in hiring, firing, promotions, and benefits – especially in the public sector.

What states have not ratified the Equal Rights Amendment? ›

The 15 states that did not ratify the Equal Rights Amendment before the 1982 deadline were Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Utah, and Virginia.

What is the 27 amendment in simple terms? ›

The Twenty-seventh Amendment (Amendment XXVII, also known as the Congressional Compensation Act of 1789) to the United States Constitution prohibits any law that increases or decreases the salary of members of Congress from taking effect until after the next election of the House of Representatives has occurred.

How many amendments are there in 2021? ›

The 27 Amendments of the US Constitution and What They Mean.

What was the last state to ratify the 27th Amendment? ›

With no time limit on ratification, the Twenty-seventh Amendment was ratified in May 7, 1992, when Michigan approved it.

Why was it important for Virginia to ratify the Constitution? ›

Each county elected two delegates to represent them at the ratification convention, and the number of Federalist and Anti-Federalist delegates were as evenly matched as the population of the state. As the largest, richest, and most populous state, Virginia's vote was crucial to the future of the United States.

Why do you think it was important for Virginia to ratify the Constitution? ›

Because Virginia was so large and influential, the new government needed Virginia's support to succeed.

Did Virginia support the Constitution? ›

The Virginia Ratifying Convention (also historically referred to as the "Virginia Federal Convention") was a convention of 168 delegates from Virginia who met in 1788 to ratify or reject the United States Constitution, which had been drafted at the Philadelphia Convention the previous year.

Videos

1. Virginia Ratify the ERA
(Todd Smyth)
2. Equal Rights Amendment: Its Rise, Fall, and Rise - US 101
(US 101)
3. What Is The Equal Rights Amendment?
(Evan Koslof)
4. Virginia Ratifies the Equal Rights Amendment | The Daily Show
(The Daily Show with Trevor Noah)
5. Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Equal Rights Amendment
(The Aspen Institute)
6. Virginia may be final state needed for ERA
(WUSA9)

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